Date   

Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

David Horner
 


On 2020-10-21 6:33 p.m., swallach wrote:
i have not totally been following this discussion.  but at convex we handled this very simply

if Vl = 0,  no vector operation was executed,  and the vector instruction was executed and sequential operation proceeded.

to the best  of my  knowledge this never came up as an issue

https://github.com/riscv/riscv-v-spec/issues/587#issuecomment-711087236

To clarify, Andrew's reading of the spec has vstart>= vl behaviour superseding vl=0 implied behaviour.

Thus some vector instructions are executed even when vl=0. vfirst and vpopc are two of them.




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On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:14:48 -0700, Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@...> said:

|     [DH]: I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
|     Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
|     or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.
|     A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
|     SOFTWARE control.

| Sure. You could guarantee forward progress, e.g. by allowing no more than 10 successive "first fault" with VL=0, and requiring trap on element zero
| on the 11th.   That check could be in hardware, or it could be in
| the software that's calling the FF instruction.

I don't want us to rathole on how to guarantee forward progress for
vl=0 case, but do want to note that this kind of forward progress is
nasty to guarantee, implying there's long-lasting microarch state to
keep around - what if you're context swapped out before you get to the
11th?  Do you have to force the first one after a context swap to not
trim?  What if there's a sequence of ff's and second one goes back to
vl=0?

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Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

swallach
 

i have not totally been following this discussion.  but at convex we handled this very simply

if Vl = 0,  no vector operation was executed,  and the vector instruction was executed and sequential operation proceeded.

to the best  of my  knowledge this never came up as an issue



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On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:14:48 -0700, Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@...> said:

|     [DH]: I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
|     Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
|     or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.
|     A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
|     SOFTWARE control.

| Sure. You could guarantee forward progress, e.g. by allowing no more than 10 successive "first fault" with VL=0, and requiring trap on element zero
| on the 11th.   That check could be in hardware, or it could be in
| the software that's calling the FF instruction.

I don't want us to rathole on how to guarantee forward progress for
vl=0 case, but do want to note that this kind of forward progress is
nasty to guarantee, implying there's long-lasting microarch state to
keep around - what if you're context swapped out before you get to the
11th?  Do you have to force the first one after a context swap to not
trim?  What if there's a sequence of ff's and second one goes back to
vl=0?

WARNING / LEGAL TEXT: This message is intended only for the use of the individual or entity to which it is addressed and may contain information which is privileged, confidential, proprietary, or exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient or the person responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are strictly prohibited from disclosing, distributing, copying, or in any way using this message. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender and destroy and delete any copies you may have received.

http://www.bsc.es/disclaimer


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

krste@...
 

- [tech-cmo] so they don't get bothered with this off-topic discussion

On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:14:48 -0700, Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@sifive.com> said:
| [DH]: I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
| Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
| or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.
| A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
| SOFTWARE control.

| Sure. You could guarantee forward progress, e.g. by allowing no more than 10 successive "first fault" with VL=0, and requiring trap on element zero
| on the 11th.   That check could be in hardware, or it could be in
| the software that's calling the FF instruction.

I don't want us to rathole on how to guarantee forward progress for
vl=0 case, but do want to note that this kind of forward progress is
nasty to guarantee, implying there's long-lasting microarch state to
keep around - what if you're context swapped out before you get to the
11th? Do you have to force the first one after a context swap to not
trim? What if there's a sequence of ff's and second one goes back to
vl=0?

| But this does not need to be in the RISC-V architectural standard. Not yet.

Let's agree on this and move on.

|  As long as the VL=0  encoding is free,  not used for  some other purpose, you can do that in your implementation.

|  Your implementation might not be able to pass the RISC-V architectural for FF,  which I assume will probably assert an error if they find FF and
| with VL=0.  but if  your hardware has a chicken bit to reduce the threshold of VL= FFs to zero, or if you have a binary translator from  the
| compliance tests  to your software guaranteed forward progress, sure.

|  Build something like that, so there's a lot of people who want it, and a few years from now we can put it into a future version of the vector
| standard.

To be clear, if this is ever done, it will be with a separate
encoding, not expanding behavior of current instructions. Returning
vl=0 is not a "free" part of encoding. Software might rightly want to
take advantage of knowing vl>0 so you cannot allow same instruction to
return vl=0 after the fact, so need a different opcode/mode.

Krste


| On 10/16/2020 4:48, David Horner wrote:

| First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.

| Even if such appear "random".

| On 2020-10-16 2:01 a.m., krste@berkeley.edu wrote:

| - I'm sure there's probably
| papers out there with this already).

| Exactly.
| I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
| Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
| or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.

| A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
| SOFTWARE control.

| I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
| be  readily checked for.
| Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a few instructions including the branch.

| (sending replies to vector list - as this is off topic for CMOs)

| My opinion is that baking SIMT execution model into ISA for purposes
| of exposing microarchitectural performance (i.e., cache misses)
| exposes too much of the machine, forcing application software to add
| extra retry loops (2nd nested loop inside of stripmining) and forcing
| system software to deal with complex traps.

|   [  Random historical connection - having a partial completion mask based
|      on cache misses is a vector version of the Stanford proposal for
|      "informing memory operations" where scalar core can branch on cache miss.
|                 https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/232974.233000 ]
|   Most of the benefit for SIMT execution around microarchitectural
| hiccups can be obtained under the hood in the microarchitecture (and
| there are several hundred ISCA/MICRO/HPCA papers on doing that - I
| might be exaggerating, but only slightly - and I know Andy worked in
| this space at some point), and should outperform putting this handling
| into software.

| That said, I think it's OK to allow FF V loads to stop anywhere past
| element 0 including at a long-latency cache miss, mainly because it
| doesn't change anything in software model.

| I'm not sure it will really help perf that much in practice.  While
| it's easy to construct an example where it looks like it would help, I
| think in general most loops touch multiple vector operands, hardware
| prefetchers do well on vector streams, vector units are more efficient
| on larger chunks, scatter-gathers missing in cache limit perf anyway,
| etc., so it's probably a fairly brittle optimization (yes, you could
| add a predictor to figure out whether to wait for the other elements
| or go ahead with a partial vector result - I'm sure there's probably
| papers out there with this already).

| Krste

| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 04:03:17 +0000, "Bill Huffman" <huffman@cadence.com> said:

| | My take is the same as Andrew has outlined below.
| |       Bill

| | On 10/15/20 4:30 PM, andrew@sifive.com wrote:

| |     EXTERNAL MAIL
|     |     Forwarding this to tech-vector-ext; couple comments below.
|     |     On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@sifive.com> wrote:

| |         In vector meeting last Friday  I listened to both Krste and David Horner's  different opinions about fault-on-first and vector
| length trimming. I realized (and may have
| |         convinced other attendees) that the  RISC-V "fault-on-first"  vector length trimming need not be done just for things like
| page-faults.
|         |         Fault-on-first could be done for the first long latency cache miss, as long as vector element zero has been completed, 
| because vector element zero is the forward progress
| |         mechanism.
|         |         Indeed, IMHO the correct semantic requirement for fault-on-first is that it completes the  element zero of the
| operation,  but that it can randomly stop with the appropriate
| |         indication for vector length  trimming at any point in the middle of the instruction.
|         |     Indeed, I've found other microarchitectural reasons to favor this approach (e.g., speculating through mask-register values). 
| Enumerating all cases in which the length might be
| |     trimmed seems like a fool's errand, so just saying it can be truncated to >= 1 for any reason is the way to go.

| |         This is part of what David Horner wants.   However, it does not give him the  fault-on-first with zero length complete
| mechanism.   It could, if there were something else in
| |         the system that guaranteed forward progress
|         |     My take is that requiring that element 0 either complete or trap is already a solid mechanism for guaranteeing forward
| progress, and cleanly matches the while-loop vectorization
| |     model.

| |         ---+ Expanded

| |         From vector meeting last Friday: trimming, fault-on-first.  I realized that it is similar to the forms of SW visible non-faulting
| speculative loads some machines, especially
| |         VLIWs, have. However, instead of delivering a NaN or NaT, it is non-faulting except for vector element 0, where it faults. The
| NaT-ness is implied by trimmed vector length.
| |         It could be implied by a mask showing which vector operations had completed.

| |         All such SW non-faulting loads need a "was this correct" operation, which might just be a faulting load and a comparison. 
| Software control flow must fall through such a
| |         check operation,  and through a redo of the faulting load if necessary. In scalar, non-faulting and faulting loads are different
| instructions, so there must be a branch.

| |         The RISC-V Fault-on-first approach  has the correctness check for non-faulting implied by redoing the instruction.  i.e. it is
| its own non-faulting check.  it gets away with
| |         this because the trend vector length indicates which parts were valid and not. forward progress is guaranteed by trapping on
| vector element zero, i.e. never allowing a trim
| |         to zero length.   if a non-faulting vector approach was used instead of fault-on-first, it could return a vector complete mask,
| but to make forward progress it would have to
| |         guarantee that at least one vector element had completed.

| |         David Horner's desire for fault-on-first that may have performed no operations at all is (1)  reasonable IMHO (I think I managed
| to explain that the Krste), but (2) Would
| |         require some other mechanism for forward progress. E.g. instead of trapping on element zero, the bitmask that I described above.
| Which is almost certainly a bigger
| |         architectural change than RISC-V should make it this time.

| |         Although more and more I am happier that I included such a completion bitmask in newly every vector instruction set that I've
| ever done. Particularly those vector instruction
| |         sets that were supposed to implement SIMT efficiently. (I think of SIMT as a programming model that is implemented on top of what
| amounts to a vector instruction set and
| |         microarchitecture.  https://pharr.org/matt/papers/ispc_inpar_2012.pdf ).  It would be unfortunate for such an SIMT program to
| lose  work completed after the first fault.

| |         MORAL:  fault-on-first may be suitable for vector load that might speculate past the end of the vector -  where the length is 
| not known or inconvenient when the vector load
| |         instruction is started. Fault-on-first is  suboptimal for running SIMT on top of vectors.   i.e. fault-on-first  is the
| equivalent of precise exceptions for in order
| |         execution,  and for a single thread executing vector instructions, whereas  completion mask  allows out of order within a vector
| and/or vector length  threading.

| |         IMHO an important realization I made in that meeting is that fault-on-first does not need to be just about faulting. It is
| totally fine to have the fault-on-first stuff
| |         return up to the  first really long latency cost miss, as long as it always  guarantees that at least vector element zero was
| complete. Because vector element zero complete
| |         is what guarantees forward progress.

| |         Furthermore, it is not even required that fault-on-first stop at the first page-fault. An implementation could actually choose to
| actually implement a page-fault that did
| |         copy-on-write or  swapped in from disk.   but that would be visible to the operating system, not the user program.  However, such
| an OS implementation  would have to
| |         guarantee that it would not kill a process as a result  of a true permissions error page-fault. Or, if the virtual memory
| architecture made the distinction between
| |         permissions faults and the sorts of page-fault that is for disk swapping or copy-on-write or copy  on read,  the OS does not need
| to be involved.

| |          EVERYTHING about fault-on-first is a microarchitecture security/information leak channel and/or a virtualization hole. (Unless
| you only trim only on true faults and not  COW
| |         or COR or disk swappage-faults).   However,  fault-on-first on any page-fault is a much  lower bandwidth  information leak 
| channel  than is fault-on-first on long latency
| |         cache misses.  so a general purpose system might choose to implement fault-on-first on any page-fault, but might not want to
| implement fault-on-first on any cache miss.
| |         However, there are some systems for which that sort of security issue is not a concern. E.g. a data center or embedded system
| where all of the CPUs are dedicated to a single
| |         problem. In which case, if they can gain performance by doing fault-on-first on particular long latency cache misses, power to
| them!

| |         Interestingly, although fault-on-first on long latency cache misses is a high-bandwidth information leak, it is actually  much
| less of a virtualization hole than
| |         fault-on-first for page-faults.   The operating system or hypervisor has very little control over cache misses.  the OS and
| hypervisor have almost full control over
| |         page-faults.  The usual rule in security and virtualization is that an application should not be able to detect that it has had
| an "innocent"  page-fault, such as COW or COR
| |         or disk swapping.

| |         --
| |         --- Sorry: Typos (Speech-Os?) Writing Errors <= Speech Recognition <= Computeritis
|     |

| --
| --- Sorry: Typos (Speech-Os?) Writing Errors <= Speech Recognition <= Computeritis


Re: Sparse Matrix-Vector Multiply (again) and Bit-Vector Compression

Nick Knight
 

Hi Dawei,

Unfortunately the V-extension does not currently feature block-matrix multiplication instructions, including the bit-masked versions that you're describing. Some of these operations are intended to be addressed by a future (sub-) extension (perhaps EDIV). 

Presently, you can apply your scheme directly to the restricted class of BCSR matrices with 1-dimensional blocks. You can imagine various (nonzero-structure-dependent) tradeoffs between using r-by-1 and 1-by-c blocks.

More generally you can recursively compose (singly or doubly compressed) block-CS{R,C} formats, encoding indices using bitvectors or lists at any level of the recursion.

Best,
Nick


On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 2:04 AM lidawei14 via lists.riscv.org <lidawei14=huawei.com@...> wrote:
Hi,

Perhaps instead of using bit vector to encode an entire matrix, we can encode a sub block.
There is a common sparse matrix format called BCSR that blocks the non-zero values of CSR, so that we can reduce col_ind[] storage and reused vector x.
The main disadvantage of BCSR is we have to pad zeros, where we can actually use a bit mask to encode nonzeros of a sub block as Nagendra's bit vector implementation so that the overhead can be avoided.
I could not find good reduction instructions for tiled matrix vector multiplications if we have multiple rows in a block.

One sub block:
A =
a b
0 d 
Corresponding x:
x =
e
f
Bit vector:
1 1 0 1
Computation:
a b 0 d 
e f e f
 
fmul = ae bf 0e df 
accumulate (reduction) ae+bf,0e+df
(Note we can skip that zero computation using bit mask).

Thanks,
Dawei


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

David Horner
 

You're incorrectly characterizing FoF below.  The FoF loads are not
intended for software to dynamically probe the microarch state to
check for possible faults

That  is not what I am advocating.

(though it can be misused that way).  The
point is to support software vector-length speculation, where whether
an access is really needed is not known ahead of time.

That is not precisely the full use case.
Rather your intended use case is :

When the application is assured that a constrained load can succeed,
     [ the system guarantees a termination condition for the load exists
     ,that it  is detectable from the data read up to and including the end point,
      and that all the data from the start point to the end point is readable]
   then FoF provides a convenient and expedited way to advance through the load.

And if you define "not known ahead of time" to mean before each successive load, then that time frameis not precisely true either.
The load could be performed one unit at a time, and each time the need would be known.
The unit requested could be of arbitrary length [successive packets of ethernet data or crypto segments].
I'm not trying to be obtuse and oppositional.
The value of FoF is to avoid the complexities of such tracking,
but if an EE were to reasonably guarantee that the data to be loaded
can be speculatively read up to a page boundary, then FoF is not needed,
nor does it necessarily provide any hard advantage over the regular strided load. 
[some implementations may detect such things as debug breakpoints and not trigger them, but as far as the software is concerned it has the speculative to-the-end-of-the-page guarantee, thus it will be content even if the debugger is annoyed]


The FoF loads are not
intended for software to dynamically probe the microarch state to
check for possible faults (though it can be misused that way).

The detection of microarch state is incidental to the characterization I attribute to FoF.
And it is not only microarch state that can be revealed but system and EE level state.

FoF fails in situations that are not covered by your use case.
Specifically, what does the EE do when it detects a situation that forward progress is not possible.
e.g. the data requested is not mapped into the process.
As I understand your use case the [standard] FoF load is aborted and its process as well.
The "enhanced/dangerous" FoF load will be allowed vl=0 to identify the "abort" case.
Consider this scenario:
A process requests the EE to maps into another process' [e.g. child's] address space pages to scan,
and the asychronous [child] co-process does the scanning.
FoF return vl=0 is eminently suited to this use case.
It is certainly possible to add to the handshaking/synchronization process the current end point of the data
that would need to be checked as each page is processed.
This can be substantial overhead and delay.

It is certainly possible to ensure that each request overreaches the natural page alignment.
However, as FoF allow the processor to reduce vl at any point, it could continually reduce vl so that it is better aligned to cache, anticipating that following request will be optimized. The program will still work, and detect potential page failures, but the false positives could be substantial and even more costly and substantially variable across implementations. [not to mention the EE thinking the process is attempting to do side channel attack].

These use cases argue for vl=0 return. And as I mentioned before, these use cases will motivate the EE to return vl=0, even without the application using the "new/corrupted" FoF encoding for vl=0 allowed.
 

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:08 AM Krste Asanovic <krste@...> wrote:

If we allow regular FoF loads to return with vl=0, we must provide a
forward-progress guarantee, otherwise the instructions are practically
unusable.

I believe I have shown practical uses above.

 The forward-progress guarantee must not add overhead to the
common cases where returning vl=0 serves no useful purpose.

I certainly agree. But when does returning vl=0 serve no useful purpose?

this is difficult to describe, especially when code may have several
FoF loads in a stripmine loop.  If allowing FoF loads to return vl=0
requires application overhead to support the forward-progresss
guarantee, then we should have a separate encoding for that
instruction so that the common case is not burdened by the esoteric
case.

There are different forward-progress guarantees.
As I mentioned before separate encoding will not provide a practical benefit.
Once the new encoding is introduced,
legacy processors will just have their EE emulate it by allowing vl=0 return
under the same conditions and the linkeditor will replace the new FoF with the old.




The FoF instructions allow software vector-length speculation in a
safe way, where the first element is checked as normal and raises any
necessary traps to the OS, while the later elements are not processed
if they're problematic.  Only if software attempts to actually process
the later elements, because processing the earlier elements deems it
necessary, is the required trap actioned.

The trap is serviced by the OS not the application.  Most commonly, it
will be a page fault, sometimes a protection violation.  Neither are
reported to the application (in general), because the application can
do nothing about these traps.  This is different from the other cases
you bring up (integer overflow, FP flags).


As mentioned before, if we think outside the box of the "classic" use case,
there certainly are meaningful and significant ways that applications can
handle EE level events (analogous to divide by zero).


There is no difficulty in providing forward progress on FoF loads in a
microarchitecture, as otherwise regular vector loads wouldn't work.
FoF loads are only a small modification to regular vector loads,
basically flushing the pipeline to change vl on a trap instead of
taking the trap and setting vstart.

The only way I would contemplate allowing trimming to vl=0 for the 1.0
standard was if there was a forward-progress guarantee that did not
burden regular uses of FoF loads. 


The default case is just such a non-burdensome approach.

Check vl=0 if you are not guaranteed to succeed.
Ignore vl=0 at your peril if you are unsure (you could end up in an infinite loop).
Ignore vl=0 if you are guaranteed not to read past valid memory.

Also, the guarantee would have to
actually enable some improvement in an implementation (as otherwise,
no one would choose to trim to 0, and we can then keep the spec
simple).

The spec will need to address this case in any event, even if to say we do not recommend EE return with vl=0.
The spec cannot mandate that EE not return vl=0. Certification does not extend to runtime constrained EEs.
Code needs to be aware that this can happen.
The net is, I don't believe the "prohibition" significantly simplifies the spec.
It may actually make it more contentious.

You simplified integer divide over other ISA that mandated a trap for divide by zero.
With this approach we mandate a trap for FoF when vl=0 would be sufficient.

Where it is inevitable that EE will do the sensible thing and
return vl=0; when forward progress [within reasonable constraints] is not possible.

 

Krste


>>>>> On Sat, 17 Oct 2020 22:39:37 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@...> said:

| On 2020-10-17 6:49 p.m., krste@... wrote:
|| - [tech-cmo] so they don't get bothered with this off-topic discussion
||
||||||| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:14:48 -0700, Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@...> said:
|| |     [DH]: I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
|| |     Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
|| |     or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.
|| |     A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
|| |     SOFTWARE control.
||
|| | Sure. You could guarantee forward progress, e.g. by allowing no more than 10 successive "first fault" with VL=0, and requiring trap on element zero
|| | on the 11th.   That check could be in hardware, or it could be in
|| | the software that's calling the FF instruction.
||
|| I don't want us to rathole on how to guarantee forward progress for
|| vl=0 case, but do want to note that this kind of forward progress is
|| nasty to guarantee, implying there's long-lasting microarch state to
|| keep around - what if you're context swapped out before you get to the
|| 11th?  Do you have to force the first one after a context swap to not
|| trim?  What if there's a sequence of ff's and second one goes back to
|| vl=0?

| Krste: I gather your answer is more in the context of lr/sc type forward
| guarantees, instructions that are designed not to trap when delivering
| on their primary function.

|     So  I agree that determining an appropriate deferred trap is
| problematic.

|      However, the intent of vl*ff is to operate in an environment
| anticipating exception behaviour.

|       It is the instruction's raison d'être.  If the full vl is expected
| to always be returned [with very, very few exceptions] we would not have
| this instruction, but rather direct the EE to reduce vl or abort the
| process.

|      So rather than a rathole we have the Elephant-In-The-Room. What
| does the EE do when deferred forward progress is not possible?

|      Given that the application is anticipating "trouble" with the read
| memory access, does it make sense to only address the "safe" case?

|      With float exceptions RISCV does not provide trap handlers, but
| rather FFlags for the application to electively check.

|      With integer overflow or zero divide RISCV does not provide trap
| handlers, but requires the application to include code to detect the
| condition.

|      Trap handlers for vl*ff are only incidental. They are no more
| special to vl*ff than any other of the vl*, or the RVI lw,lh,lb, etc.

|      In apparent contradiction to the spec, a valid implementations can
| "trap" as it would for the non-ff but not service the fault, only reduce
| the vl accordingly until the fault occurs on the first element.

|      Thus central to the functioning of the instruction is what happens
| when the fault occurs on the first element.

|      Punting to the handler is not an answer. Return at least one
| element or trap does not define the operational characteristics [even if
| it may arguably be an ISA architectural answer].

|      There is nothing prohibiting the trap from returning vl=0. And I
| argue that EEs will indeed elect to do that when there can be no forward
| progress [e.g. the requested address is mapped execute only].

|      Platforms will stipulate a behaviour and vl=0 will be a choice.
| What we should try to address is how to allow greatest portability and
| least software fragmentation.

|    I believe this should be accomplished exactly was effected for the
| integer overflow. Exclude the checking code if you do not need it, and
| include it if you are not assured that it is superflous.

|   In other words vl=0 must be handled , either by avoidance or
| explicitly as indication that is nothing to process.

|| | But this does not need to be in the RISC-V architectural standard. Not yet.
||
|| Let's agree on this and move on.
| There is no value in ignoring the issue.
||


Vector TG meeting minutes 2020/10/16

Krste Asanovic
 

Date: 2020/10/16
Task Group: Vector Extension
Chair: Krste Asanovic
Co-Chair: Roger Espasa
Number of Attendees: ~16
Current issues on github: https://github.com/riscv/riscv-v-spec

# Definition of Done checklist

We discussed what items on the "definitions of done" checklist are not
currently underway, including the architectural compliance tests and
the SAIL formal model.

# 550 Names/contents of initial vector subsets.

We discussed the proposals for initial vector subsets for
microcontroller/embedded use cases. The proposed five subsets are
Zve32x, Zve32f, Zve64x, Zve64f, Zve64d.

The consensus was to not include Zvamo in these, as some embedded
memory systems do not have caches, and many interconnects do not
support atomics.

vrgather instruction was discussed for omission, but the consensus was
that if indexed memory accesses were to be supported (which had
agreement), then vrgather was relatively easy to add and was very
useful, especially in low-ended embedded systems with limited memory
systems.

reductions were discussed for omission, but it was felt that they're
commonly used and they would fragment the software base too much if
left out.

There was some discussion about supporting only LMUL=1, but was noted
this would not allow use of the widening and narrowing instructions.
Another proposal was to support only LMUL<=1, as this would simplify
some implementations while still supporting the full instruction set.
This would form an even more minimal base.

There was no clear consensus on requiring a minimum VLEN>ELEN. This
would interact with a proposal to allow LMUL<=1, in that a longer VLEN
might be mandated if LMUL<=1 since larger LMULs could not be used to
hold longer vectors.

We did not reach agreement on whether 64b integer multiplies should be
included in Zve64f subset.


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Krste Asanovic
 

If we allow regular FoF loads to return with vl=0, we must provide a
forward-progress guarantee, otherwise the instructions are practically
unusable. The forward-progress guarantee must not add overhead to the
common cases where returning vl=0 serves no useful purpose. I believe
this is difficult to describe, especially when code may have several
FoF loads in a stripmine loop. If allowing FoF loads to return vl=0
requires application overhead to support the forward-progresss
guarantee, then we should have a separate encoding for that
instruction so that the common case is not burdened by the esoteric
case.

You're incorrectly characterizing FoF below. The FoF loads are not
intended for software to dynamically probe the microarch state to
check for possible faults (though it can be misused that way). The
point is to support software vector-length speculation, where whether
an access is really needed is not known ahead of time.

The FoF instructions allow software vector-length speculation in a
safe way, where the first element is checked as normal and raises any
necessary traps to the OS, while the later elements are not processed
if they're problematic. Only if software attempts to actually process
the later elements, because processing the earlier elements deems it
necessary, is the required trap actioned.

The trap is serviced by the OS not the application. Most commonly, it
will be a page fault, sometimes a protection violation. Neither are
reported to the application (in general), because the application can
do nothing about these traps. This is different from the other cases
you bring up (integer overflow, FP flags).

There is no difficulty in providing forward progress on FoF loads in a
microarchitecture, as otherwise regular vector loads wouldn't work.
FoF loads are only a small modification to regular vector loads,
basically flushing the pipeline to change vl on a trap instead of
taking the trap and setting vstart.

The only way I would contemplate allowing trimming to vl=0 for the 1.0
standard was if there was a forward-progress guarantee that did not
burden regular uses of FoF loads. Also, the guarantee would have to
actually enable some improvement in an implementation (as otherwise,
no one would choose to trim to 0, and we can then keep the spec
simple).

Krste


On Sat, 17 Oct 2020 22:39:37 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@gmail.com> said:
| On 2020-10-17 6:49 p.m., krste@sifive.com wrote:
|| - [tech-cmo] so they don't get bothered with this off-topic discussion
||
||||||| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:14:48 -0700, Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@sifive.com> said:
|| | [DH]: I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
|| | Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
|| | or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.
|| | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
|| | SOFTWARE control.
||
|| | Sure. You could guarantee forward progress, e.g. by allowing no more than 10 successive "first fault" with VL=0, and requiring trap on element zero
|| | on the 11th.   That check could be in hardware, or it could be in
|| | the software that's calling the FF instruction.
||
|| I don't want us to rathole on how to guarantee forward progress for
|| vl=0 case, but do want to note that this kind of forward progress is
|| nasty to guarantee, implying there's long-lasting microarch state to
|| keep around - what if you're context swapped out before you get to the
|| 11th? Do you have to force the first one after a context swap to not
|| trim? What if there's a sequence of ff's and second one goes back to
|| vl=0?

| Krste: I gather your answer is more in the context of lr/sc type forward
| guarantees, instructions that are designed not to trap when delivering
| on their primary function.

|    So  I agree that determining an appropriate deferred trap is
| problematic.

|     However, the intent of vl*ff is to operate in an environment
| anticipating exception behaviour.

|      It is the instruction's raison d'être.  If the full vl is expected
| to always be returned [with very, very few exceptions] we would not have
| this instruction, but rather direct the EE to reduce vl or abort the
| process.

|     So rather than a rathole we have the Elephant-In-The-Room. What
| does the EE do when deferred forward progress is not possible?

|     Given that the application is anticipating "trouble" with the read
| memory access, does it make sense to only address the "safe" case?

|     With float exceptions RISCV does not provide trap handlers, but
| rather FFlags for the application to electively check.

|     With integer overflow or zero divide RISCV does not provide trap
| handlers, but requires the application to include code to detect the
| condition.

|     Trap handlers for vl*ff are only incidental. They are no more
| special to vl*ff than any other of the vl*, or the RVI lw,lh,lb, etc.

|     In apparent contradiction to the spec, a valid implementations can
| "trap" as it would for the non-ff but not service the fault, only reduce
| the vl accordingly until the fault occurs on the first element.

|     Thus central to the functioning of the instruction is what happens
| when the fault occurs on the first element.

|     Punting to the handler is not an answer. Return at least one
| element or trap does not define the operational characteristics [even if
| it may arguably be an ISA architectural answer].

|     There is nothing prohibiting the trap from returning vl=0. And I
| argue that EEs will indeed elect to do that when there can be no forward
| progress [e.g. the requested address is mapped execute only].

|     Platforms will stipulate a behaviour and vl=0 will be a choice.
| What we should try to address is how to allow greatest portability and
| least software fragmentation.

|   I believe this should be accomplished exactly was effected for the
| integer overflow. Exclude the checking code if you do not need it, and
| include it if you are not assured that it is superflous.

|  In other words vl=0 must be handled , either by avoidance or
| explicitly as indication that is nothing to process.

|| | But this does not need to be in the RISC-V architectural standard. Not yet.
||
|| Let's agree on this and move on.
| There is no value in ignoring the issue.
||
|| |  As long as the VL=0  encoding is free,  not used for  some other purpose, you can do that in your implementation.
||
|| |  Your implementation might not be able to pass the RISC-V architectural for FF,  which I assume will probably assert an error if they find FF and
|| | with VL=0.  but if  your hardware has a chicken bit to reduce the threshold of VL= FFs to zero, or if you have a binary translator from  the
|| | compliance tests  to your software guaranteed forward progress, sure.
||
|| |  Build something like that, so there's a lot of people who want it, and a few years from now we can put it into a future version of the vector
|| | standard.
||
|| To be clear, if this is ever done, it will be with a separate
|| encoding, not expanding behavior of current instructions. Returning
|| vl=0 is not a "free" part of encoding. Software might rightly want to
|| take advantage of knowing vl>0 so you cannot allow same instruction to
|| return vl=0 after the fact, so need a different opcode/mode.
| And it is precisely because this backward compatibility is not managed
| if we tactically ignore vl=0 that we must address it, and allow vl=0 for
| V1.0.
||
|| Krste
||
||
|| | On 10/16/2020 4:48, David Horner wrote:
||
|| | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
||
|| | Even if such appear "random".
||
|| | On 2020-10-16 2:01 a.m., krste@berkeley.edu wrote:
||
|| | - I'm sure there's probably
|| | papers out there with this already).
||
|| | Exactly.
|| | I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
|| | Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
|| | or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.
||
|| | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
|| | SOFTWARE control.
||
|| | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
|| | be  readily checked for.
|| | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a few instructions including the branch.
||
|| | (sending replies to vector list - as this is off topic for CMOs)
||
|| | My opinion is that baking SIMT execution model into ISA for purposes
|| | of exposing microarchitectural performance (i.e., cache misses)
|| | exposes too much of the machine, forcing application software to add
|| | extra retry loops (2nd nested loop inside of stripmining) and forcing
|| | system software to deal with complex traps.
||
|| |   [  Random historical connection - having a partial completion mask based
|| |      on cache misses is a vector version of the Stanford proposal for
|| |      "informing memory operations" where scalar core can branch on cache miss.
|| |                 https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/232974.233000 ]
|| |   Most of the benefit for SIMT execution around microarchitectural
|| | hiccups can be obtained under the hood in the microarchitecture (and
|| | there are several hundred ISCA/MICRO/HPCA papers on doing that - I
|| | might be exaggerating, but only slightly - and I know Andy worked in
|| | this space at some point), and should outperform putting this handling
|| | into software.
||
|| | That said, I think it's OK to allow FF V loads to stop anywhere past
|| | element 0 including at a long-latency cache miss, mainly because it
|| | doesn't change anything in software model.
||
|| | I'm not sure it will really help perf that much in practice.  While
|| | it's easy to construct an example where it looks like it would help, I
|| | think in general most loops touch multiple vector operands, hardware
|| | prefetchers do well on vector streams, vector units are more efficient
|| | on larger chunks, scatter-gathers missing in cache limit perf anyway,
|| | etc., so it's probably a fairly brittle optimization (yes, you could
|| | add a predictor to figure out whether to wait for the other elements
|| | or go ahead with a partial vector result - I'm sure there's probably
|| | papers out there with this already).
||
|| | Krste
||
|| | On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 04:03:17 +0000, "Bill Huffman" <huffman@cadence.com> said:
||
|| | | My take is the same as Andrew has outlined below.
|| | |       Bill
||
|| | | On 10/15/20 4:30 PM, andrew@sifive.com wrote:
||
|| | |     EXTERNAL MAIL
|| |     |     Forwarding this to tech-vector-ext; couple comments below.
|| |     |     On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@sifive.com> wrote:
||
|| | |         In vector meeting last Friday  I listened to both Krste and David Horner's  different opinions about fault-on-first and vector
|| | length trimming. I realized (and may have
|| | |         convinced other attendees) that the  RISC-V "fault-on-first"  vector length trimming need not be done just for things like
|| | page-faults.
|| |         |         Fault-on-first could be done for the first long latency cache miss, as long as vector element zero has been completed,
|| | because vector element zero is the forward progress
|| | |         mechanism.
|| |         |         Indeed, IMHO the correct semantic requirement for fault-on-first is that it completes the  element zero of the
|| | operation,  but that it can randomly stop with the appropriate
|| | |         indication for vector length  trimming at any point in the middle of the instruction.
|| |         |     Indeed, I've found other microarchitectural reasons to favor this approach (e.g., speculating through mask-register values).
|| | Enumerating all cases in which the length might be
|| | |     trimmed seems like a fool's errand, so just saying it can be truncated to >= 1 for any reason is the way to go.
||
|| | |         This is part of what David Horner wants.   However, it does not give him the  fault-on-first with zero length complete
|| | mechanism.   It could, if there were something else in
|| | |         the system that guaranteed forward progress
|| |         |     My take is that requiring that element 0 either complete or trap is already a solid mechanism for guaranteeing forward
|| | progress, and cleanly matches the while-loop vectorization
|| | |     model.
||
|| | |         ---+ Expanded
||
|| | |         From vector meeting last Friday: trimming, fault-on-first.  I realized that it is similar to the forms of SW visible non-faulting
|| | speculative loads some machines, especially
|| | |         VLIWs, have. However, instead of delivering a NaN or NaT, it is non-faulting except for vector element 0, where it faults. The
|| | NaT-ness is implied by trimmed vector length.
|| | |         It could be implied by a mask showing which vector operations had completed.
||
|| | |         All such SW non-faulting loads need a "was this correct" operation, which might just be a faulting load and a comparison.
|| | Software control flow must fall through such a
|| | |         check operation,  and through a redo of the faulting load if necessary. In scalar, non-faulting and faulting loads are different
|| | instructions, so there must be a branch.
||
|| | |         The RISC-V Fault-on-first approach  has the correctness check for non-faulting implied by redoing the instruction.  i.e. it is
|| | its own non-faulting check.  it gets away with
|| | |         this because the trend vector length indicates which parts were valid and not. forward progress is guaranteed by trapping on
|| | vector element zero, i.e. never allowing a trim
|| | |         to zero length.   if a non-faulting vector approach was used instead of fault-on-first, it could return a vector complete mask,
|| | but to make forward progress it would have to
|| | |         guarantee that at least one vector element had completed.
||
|| | |         David Horner's desire for fault-on-first that may have performed no operations at all is (1)  reasonable IMHO (I think I managed
|| | to explain that the Krste), but (2) Would
|| | |         require some other mechanism for forward progress. E.g. instead of trapping on element zero, the bitmask that I described above.
|| | Which is almost certainly a bigger
|| | |         architectural change than RISC-V should make it this time.
||
|| | |         Although more and more I am happier that I included such a completion bitmask in newly every vector instruction set that I've
|| | ever done. Particularly those vector instruction
|| | |         sets that were supposed to implement SIMT efficiently. (I think of SIMT as a programming model that is implemented on top of what
|| | amounts to a vector instruction set and
|| | |         microarchitecture.  https://pharr.org/matt/papers/ispc_inpar_2012.pdf ).  It would be unfortunate for such an SIMT program to
|| | lose  work completed after the first fault.
||
|| | |         MORAL:  fault-on-first may be suitable for vector load that might speculate past the end of the vector -  where the length is
|| | not known or inconvenient when the vector load
|| | |         instruction is started. Fault-on-first is  suboptimal for running SIMT on top of vectors.   i.e. fault-on-first  is the
|| | equivalent of precise exceptions for in order
|| | |         execution,  and for a single thread executing vector instructions, whereas  completion mask  allows out of order within a vector
|| | and/or vector length  threading.
||
|| | |         IMHO an important realization I made in that meeting is that fault-on-first does not need to be just about faulting. It is
|| | totally fine to have the fault-on-first stuff
|| | |         return up to the  first really long latency cost miss, as long as it always  guarantees that at least vector element zero was
|| | complete. Because vector element zero complete
|| | |         is what guarantees forward progress.
||
|| | |         Furthermore, it is not even required that fault-on-first stop at the first page-fault. An implementation could actually choose to
|| | actually implement a page-fault that did
|| | |         copy-on-write or  swapped in from disk.   but that would be visible to the operating system, not the user program.  However, such
|| | an OS implementation  would have to
|| | |         guarantee that it would not kill a process as a result  of a true permissions error page-fault. Or, if the virtual memory
|| | architecture made the distinction between
|| | |         permissions faults and the sorts of page-fault that is for disk swapping or copy-on-write or copy  on read,  the OS does not need
|| | to be involved.
||
|| | |          EVERYTHING about fault-on-first is a microarchitecture security/information leak channel and/or a virtualization hole. (Unless
|| | you only trim only on true faults and not  COW
|| | |         or COR or disk swappage-faults).   However,  fault-on-first on any page-fault is a much  lower bandwidth  information leak
|| | channel  than is fault-on-first on long latency
|| | |         cache misses.  so a general purpose system might choose to implement fault-on-first on any page-fault, but might not want to
|| | implement fault-on-first on any cache miss.
|| | |         However, there are some systems for which that sort of security issue is not a concern. E.g. a data center or embedded system
|| | where all of the CPUs are dedicated to a single
|| | |         problem. In which case, if they can gain performance by doing fault-on-first on particular long latency cache misses, power to
|| | them!
||
|| | |         Interestingly, although fault-on-first on long latency cache misses is a high-bandwidth information leak, it is actually  much
|| | less of a virtualization hole than
|| | |         fault-on-first for page-faults.   The operating system or hypervisor has very little control over cache misses.  the OS and
|| | hypervisor have almost full control over
|| | |         page-faults.  The usual rule in security and virtualization is that an application should not be able to detect that it has had
|| | an "innocent"  page-fault, such as COW or COR
|| | |         or disk swapping.
||
|| | |         --
|| | |         --- Sorry: Typos (Speech-Os?) Writing Errors <= Speech Recognition <= Computeritis
|| |     |
||
|| | --
|| | --- Sorry: Typos (Speech-Os?) Writing Errors <= Speech Recognition <= Computeritis


|


Re: Sparse Matrix-Vector Multiply (again) and Bit-Vector Compression

lidawei14@...
 

Hi,

Perhaps instead of using bit vector to encode an entire matrix, we can encode a sub block.
There is a common sparse matrix format called BCSR that blocks the non-zero values of CSR, so that we can reduce col_ind[] storage and reused vector x.
The main disadvantage of BCSR is we have to pad zeros, where we can actually use a bit mask to encode nonzeros of a sub block as Nagendra's bit vector implementation so that the overhead can be avoided.
I could not find good reduction instructions for tiled matrix vector multiplications if we have multiple rows in a block.

One sub block:
A =
a b
0 d 
Corresponding x:
x =
e
f
Bit vector:
1 1 0 1
Computation:
a b 0 d 
e f e f
 
fmul = ae bf 0e df 
accumulate (reduction) ae+bf,0e+df
(Note we can skip that zero computation using bit mask).

Thanks,
Dawei


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

David Horner
 

On 2020-10-17 6:49 p.m., krste@sifive.com wrote:
- [tech-cmo] so they don't get bothered with this off-topic discussion

On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:14:48 -0700, Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@sifive.com> said:
| [DH]: I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
| Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
| or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.
| A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
| SOFTWARE control.
| Sure. You could guarantee forward progress, e.g. by allowing no more than 10 successive "first fault" with VL=0, and requiring trap on element zero
| on the 11th.   That check could be in hardware, or it could be in
| the software that's calling the FF instruction.

I don't want us to rathole on how to guarantee forward progress for
vl=0 case, but do want to note that this kind of forward progress is
nasty to guarantee, implying there's long-lasting microarch state to
keep around - what if you're context swapped out before you get to the
11th? Do you have to force the first one after a context swap to not
trim? What if there's a sequence of ff's and second one goes back to
vl=0?
Krste: I gather your answer is more in the context of lr/sc type forward guarantees, instructions that are designed not to trap when delivering on their primary function.

   So  I agree that determining an appropriate deferred trap is problematic.

    However, the intent of vl*ff is to operate in an environment anticipating exception behaviour.

     It is the instruction's raison d'être.  If the full vl is expected to always be returned [with very, very few exceptions] we would not have this instruction, but rather direct the EE to reduce vl or abort the process.

    So rather than a rathole we have the Elephant-In-The-Room. What does the EE do when deferred forward progress is not possible?

    Given that the application is anticipating "trouble" with the read memory access, does it make sense to only address the "safe" case?

    With float exceptions RISCV does not provide trap handlers, but rather FFlags for the application to electively check.

    With integer overflow or zero divide RISCV does not provide trap handlers, but requires the application to include code to detect the condition.

    Trap handlers for vl*ff are only incidental. They are no more special to vl*ff than any other of the vl*, or the RVI lw,lh,lb, etc.

    In apparent contradiction to the spec, a valid implementations can "trap" as it would for the non-ff but not service the fault, only reduce the vl accordingly until the fault occurs on the first element.

    Thus central to the functioning of the instruction is what happens when the fault occurs on the first element.

    Punting to the handler is not an answer. Return at least one element or trap does not define the operational characteristics [even if it may arguably be an ISA architectural answer].

    There is nothing prohibiting the trap from returning vl=0. And I argue that EEs will indeed elect to do that when there can be no forward progress [e.g. the requested address is mapped execute only].

    Platforms will stipulate a behaviour and vl=0 will be a choice. What we should try to address is how to allow greatest portability and least software fragmentation.

  I believe this should be accomplished exactly was effected for the integer overflow. Exclude the checking code if you do not need it, and include it if you are not assured that it is superflous.

 In other words vl=0 must be handled , either by avoidance or explicitly as indication that is nothing to process.

| But this does not need to be in the RISC-V architectural standard. Not yet.

Let's agree on this and move on.
There is no value in ignoring the issue.

|  As long as the VL=0  encoding is free,  not used for  some other purpose, you can do that in your implementation.

|  Your implementation might not be able to pass the RISC-V architectural for FF,  which I assume will probably assert an error if they find FF and
| with VL=0.  but if  your hardware has a chicken bit to reduce the threshold of VL= FFs to zero, or if you have a binary translator from  the
| compliance tests  to your software guaranteed forward progress, sure.

|  Build something like that, so there's a lot of people who want it, and a few years from now we can put it into a future version of the vector
| standard.

To be clear, if this is ever done, it will be with a separate
encoding, not expanding behavior of current instructions. Returning
vl=0 is not a "free" part of encoding. Software might rightly want to
take advantage of knowing vl>0 so you cannot allow same instruction to
return vl=0 after the fact, so need a different opcode/mode.
And it is precisely because this backward compatibility is not managed if we tactically ignore vl=0 that we must address it, and allow vl=0 for V1.0.

Krste


| On 10/16/2020 4:48, David Horner wrote:

| First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
| Even if such appear "random".

| On 2020-10-16 2:01 a.m., krste@berkeley.edu wrote:
| - I'm sure there's probably
| papers out there with this already).
| Exactly.
| I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
| Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
| or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.
| A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
| SOFTWARE control.
| I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
| be  readily checked for.
| Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a few instructions including the branch.
| (sending replies to vector list - as this is off topic for CMOs)
| My opinion is that baking SIMT execution model into ISA for purposes
| of exposing microarchitectural performance (i.e., cache misses)
| exposes too much of the machine, forcing application software to add
| extra retry loops (2nd nested loop inside of stripmining) and forcing
| system software to deal with complex traps.
|   [  Random historical connection - having a partial completion mask based
|      on cache misses is a vector version of the Stanford proposal for
|      "informing memory operations" where scalar core can branch on cache miss.
|                 https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/232974.233000 ]
|   Most of the benefit for SIMT execution around microarchitectural
| hiccups can be obtained under the hood in the microarchitecture (and
| there are several hundred ISCA/MICRO/HPCA papers on doing that - I
| might be exaggerating, but only slightly - and I know Andy worked in
| this space at some point), and should outperform putting this handling
| into software.
| That said, I think it's OK to allow FF V loads to stop anywhere past
| element 0 including at a long-latency cache miss, mainly because it
| doesn't change anything in software model.
| I'm not sure it will really help perf that much in practice.  While
| it's easy to construct an example where it looks like it would help, I
| think in general most loops touch multiple vector operands, hardware
| prefetchers do well on vector streams, vector units are more efficient
| on larger chunks, scatter-gathers missing in cache limit perf anyway,
| etc., so it's probably a fairly brittle optimization (yes, you could
| add a predictor to figure out whether to wait for the other elements
| or go ahead with a partial vector result - I'm sure there's probably
| papers out there with this already).
| Krste

| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 04:03:17 +0000, "Bill Huffman" <huffman@cadence.com> said:
| | My take is the same as Andrew has outlined below.
| |       Bill
| | On 10/15/20 4:30 PM, andrew@sifive.com wrote:
| |     EXTERNAL MAIL
|     |     Forwarding this to tech-vector-ext; couple comments below.
|     |     On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@sifive.com> wrote:
| |         In vector meeting last Friday  I listened to both Krste and David Horner's  different opinions about fault-on-first and vector
| length trimming. I realized (and may have
| |         convinced other attendees) that the  RISC-V "fault-on-first"  vector length trimming need not be done just for things like
| page-faults.
|         |         Fault-on-first could be done for the first long latency cache miss, as long as vector element zero has been completed,
| because vector element zero is the forward progress
| |         mechanism.
|         |         Indeed, IMHO the correct semantic requirement for fault-on-first is that it completes the  element zero of the
| operation,  but that it can randomly stop with the appropriate
| |         indication for vector length  trimming at any point in the middle of the instruction.
|         |     Indeed, I've found other microarchitectural reasons to favor this approach (e.g., speculating through mask-register values).
| Enumerating all cases in which the length might be
| |     trimmed seems like a fool's errand, so just saying it can be truncated to >= 1 for any reason is the way to go.
| |         This is part of what David Horner wants.   However, it does not give him the  fault-on-first with zero length complete
| mechanism.   It could, if there were something else in
| |         the system that guaranteed forward progress
|         |     My take is that requiring that element 0 either complete or trap is already a solid mechanism for guaranteeing forward
| progress, and cleanly matches the while-loop vectorization
| |     model.
| |         ---+ Expanded
| |         From vector meeting last Friday: trimming, fault-on-first.  I realized that it is similar to the forms of SW visible non-faulting
| speculative loads some machines, especially
| |         VLIWs, have. However, instead of delivering a NaN or NaT, it is non-faulting except for vector element 0, where it faults. The
| NaT-ness is implied by trimmed vector length.
| |         It could be implied by a mask showing which vector operations had completed.
| |         All such SW non-faulting loads need a "was this correct" operation, which might just be a faulting load and a comparison.
| Software control flow must fall through such a
| |         check operation,  and through a redo of the faulting load if necessary. In scalar, non-faulting and faulting loads are different
| instructions, so there must be a branch.
| |         The RISC-V Fault-on-first approach  has the correctness check for non-faulting implied by redoing the instruction.  i.e. it is
| its own non-faulting check.  it gets away with
| |         this because the trend vector length indicates which parts were valid and not. forward progress is guaranteed by trapping on
| vector element zero, i.e. never allowing a trim
| |         to zero length.   if a non-faulting vector approach was used instead of fault-on-first, it could return a vector complete mask,
| but to make forward progress it would have to
| |         guarantee that at least one vector element had completed.
| |         David Horner's desire for fault-on-first that may have performed no operations at all is (1)  reasonable IMHO (I think I managed
| to explain that the Krste), but (2) Would
| |         require some other mechanism for forward progress. E.g. instead of trapping on element zero, the bitmask that I described above.
| Which is almost certainly a bigger
| |         architectural change than RISC-V should make it this time.
| |         Although more and more I am happier that I included such a completion bitmask in newly every vector instruction set that I've
| ever done. Particularly those vector instruction
| |         sets that were supposed to implement SIMT efficiently. (I think of SIMT as a programming model that is implemented on top of what
| amounts to a vector instruction set and
| |         microarchitecture.  https://pharr.org/matt/papers/ispc_inpar_2012.pdf ).  It would be unfortunate for such an SIMT program to
| lose  work completed after the first fault.
| |         MORAL:  fault-on-first may be suitable for vector load that might speculate past the end of the vector -  where the length is
| not known or inconvenient when the vector load
| |         instruction is started. Fault-on-first is  suboptimal for running SIMT on top of vectors.   i.e. fault-on-first  is the
| equivalent of precise exceptions for in order
| |         execution,  and for a single thread executing vector instructions, whereas  completion mask  allows out of order within a vector
| and/or vector length  threading.
| |         IMHO an important realization I made in that meeting is that fault-on-first does not need to be just about faulting. It is
| totally fine to have the fault-on-first stuff
| |         return up to the  first really long latency cost miss, as long as it always  guarantees that at least vector element zero was
| complete. Because vector element zero complete
| |         is what guarantees forward progress.
| |         Furthermore, it is not even required that fault-on-first stop at the first page-fault. An implementation could actually choose to
| actually implement a page-fault that did
| |         copy-on-write or  swapped in from disk.   but that would be visible to the operating system, not the user program.  However, such
| an OS implementation  would have to
| |         guarantee that it would not kill a process as a result  of a true permissions error page-fault. Or, if the virtual memory
| architecture made the distinction between
| |         permissions faults and the sorts of page-fault that is for disk swapping or copy-on-write or copy  on read,  the OS does not need
| to be involved.
| |          EVERYTHING about fault-on-first is a microarchitecture security/information leak channel and/or a virtualization hole. (Unless
| you only trim only on true faults and not  COW
| |         or COR or disk swappage-faults).   However,  fault-on-first on any page-fault is a much  lower bandwidth  information leak
| channel  than is fault-on-first on long latency
| |         cache misses.  so a general purpose system might choose to implement fault-on-first on any page-fault, but might not want to
| implement fault-on-first on any cache miss.
| |         However, there are some systems for which that sort of security issue is not a concern. E.g. a data center or embedded system
| where all of the CPUs are dedicated to a single
| |         problem. In which case, if they can gain performance by doing fault-on-first on particular long latency cache misses, power to
| them!
| |         Interestingly, although fault-on-first on long latency cache misses is a high-bandwidth information leak, it is actually  much
| less of a virtualization hole than
| |         fault-on-first for page-faults.   The operating system or hypervisor has very little control over cache misses.  the OS and
| hypervisor have almost full control over
| |         page-faults.  The usual rule in security and virtualization is that an application should not be able to detect that it has had
| an "innocent"  page-fault, such as COW or COR
| |         or disk swapping.
| |         --
| |         --- Sorry: Typos (Speech-Os?) Writing Errors <= Speech Recognition <= Computeritis
|     |
| --
| --- Sorry: Typos (Speech-Os?) Writing Errors <= Speech Recognition <= Computeritis


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Andy Glew Si5
 

[DH]: I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.

A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under SOFTWARE control.

Sure. You could guarantee forward progress, e.g. by allowing no more than 10 successive "first fault" with VL=0, and requiring trap on element zero on the 11th.   That check could be in hardware, or it could be in the software that's calling the FF instruction.

But this does not need to be in the RISC-V architectural standard. Not yet.

 As long as the VL=0  encoding is free,  not used for  some other purpose, you can do that in your implementation.

 Your implementation might not be able to pass the RISC-V architectural for FF,  which I assume will probably assert an error if they find FF and with VL=0.  but if  your hardware has a chicken bit to reduce the threshold of VL= FFs to zero, or if you have a binary translator from  the compliance tests  to your software guaranteed forward progress, sure.

 Build something like that, so there's a lot of people who want it, and a few years from now we can put it into a future version of the vector standard.



On 10/16/2020 4:48, David Horner wrote:
First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.

Even if such appear "random".


On 2020-10-16 2:01 a.m., krste@... wrote:
- I'm sure there's probably
papers out there with this already).
Exactly.
I see this openness/lack of arbitrary constraint  as  precisely  the strength of RISCV.
Limiting vector operations due to current constraints in software (Linuz does it this way, compilers cannot optimize that formulation[yet])
or hardware (reminiscent of delayed branch because prediction was too expensive) is short sighted.

A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under SOFTWARE control.

I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can be  readily checked for.
Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a few instructions including the branch.
(sending replies to vector list - as this is off topic for CMOs)

My opinion is that baking SIMT execution model into ISA for purposes
of exposing microarchitectural performance (i.e., cache misses)
exposes too much of the machine, forcing application software to add
extra retry loops (2nd nested loop inside of stripmining) and forcing
system software to deal with complex traps.

  [  Random historical connection - having a partial completion mask based
     on cache misses is a vector version of the Stanford proposal for
     "informing memory operations" where scalar core can branch on cache miss.
                https://dl.acm.org/doi/10.1145/232974.233000 ]
  Most of the benefit for SIMT execution around microarchitectural
hiccups can be obtained under the hood in the microarchitecture (and
there are several hundred ISCA/MICRO/HPCA papers on doing that - I
might be exaggerating, but only slightly - and I know Andy worked in
this space at some point), and should outperform putting this handling
into software.

That said, I think it's OK to allow FF V loads to stop anywhere past
element 0 including at a long-latency cache miss, mainly because it
doesn't change anything in software model.

I'm not sure it will really help perf that much in practice.  While
it's easy to construct an example where it looks like it would help, I
think in general most loops touch multiple vector operands, hardware
prefetchers do well on vector streams, vector units are more efficient
on larger chunks, scatter-gathers missing in cache limit perf anyway,
etc., so it's probably a fairly brittle optimization (yes, you could
add a predictor to figure out whether to wait for the other elements
or go ahead with a partial vector result - I'm sure there's probably
papers out there with this already).

Krste

On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 04:03:17 +0000, "Bill Huffman" <huffman@...> said:
| My take is the same as Andrew has outlined below.
|       Bill

| On 10/15/20 4:30 PM, andrew@... wrote:

|     EXTERNAL MAIL
    |     Forwarding this to tech-vector-ext; couple comments below.
    |     On Thu, Oct 15, 2020 at 2:33 PM Andy Glew Si5 <andy.glew@...> wrote:

|         In vector meeting last Friday  I listened to both Krste and David Horner's  different opinions about fault-on-first and vector length trimming. I realized (and may have
|         convinced other attendees) that the  RISC-V "fault-on-first"  vector length trimming need not be done just for things like page-faults.
        |         Fault-on-first could be done for the first long latency cache miss, as long as vector element zero has been completed,  because vector element zero is the forward progress
|         mechanism.
        |         Indeed, IMHO the correct semantic requirement for fault-on-first is that it completes the  element zero of the operation,  but that it can randomly stop with the appropriate
|         indication for vector length  trimming at any point in the middle of the instruction.
        |     Indeed, I've found other microarchitectural reasons to favor this approach (e.g., speculating through mask-register values).  Enumerating all cases in which the length might be
|     trimmed seems like a fool's errand, so just saying it can be truncated to >= 1 for any reason is the way to go.

|         This is part of what David Horner wants.   However, it does not give him the  fault-on-first with zero length complete mechanism.   It could, if there were something else in
|         the system that guaranteed forward progress
        |     My take is that requiring that element 0 either complete or trap is already a solid mechanism for guaranteeing forward progress, and cleanly matches the while-loop vectorization
|     model.

|         ---+ Expanded

|         From vector meeting last Friday: trimming, fault-on-first.  I realized that it is similar to the forms of SW visible non-faulting speculative loads some machines, especially
|         VLIWs, have. However, instead of delivering a NaN or NaT, it is non-faulting except for vector element 0, where it faults. The NaT-ness is implied by trimmed vector length.
|         It could be implied by a mask showing which vector operations had completed.

|         All such SW non-faulting loads need a "was this correct" operation, which might just be a faulting load and a comparison.  Software control flow must fall through such a
|         check operation,  and through a redo of the faulting load if necessary. In scalar, non-faulting and faulting loads are different instructions, so there must be a branch.

|         The RISC-V Fault-on-first approach  has the correctness check for non-faulting implied by redoing the instruction.  i.e. it is its own non-faulting check.  it gets away with
|         this because the trend vector length indicates which parts were valid and not. forward progress is guaranteed by trapping on vector element zero, i.e. never allowing a trim
|         to zero length.   if a non-faulting vector approach was used instead of fault-on-first, it could return a vector complete mask, but to make forward progress it would have to
|         guarantee that at least one vector element had completed.

|         David Horner's desire for fault-on-first that may have performed no operations at all is (1)  reasonable IMHO (I think I managed to explain that the Krste), but (2) Would
|         require some other mechanism for forward progress. E.g. instead of trapping on element zero, the bitmask that I described above. Which is almost certainly a bigger
|         architectural change than RISC-V should make it this time.

|         Although more and more I am happier that I included such a completion bitmask in newly every vector instruction set that I've ever done. Particularly those vector instruction
|         sets that were supposed to implement SIMT efficiently. (I think of SIMT as a programming model that is implemented on top of what amounts to a vector instruction set and
|         microarchitecture.  https://pharr.org/matt/papers/ispc_inpar_2012.pdf ).  It would be unfortunate for such an SIMT program to lose  work completed after the first fault.

|         MORAL:  fault-on-first may be suitable for vector load that might speculate past the end of the vector -  where the length is  not known or inconvenient when the vector load
|         instruction is started. Fault-on-first is  suboptimal for running SIMT on top of vectors.   i.e. fault-on-first  is the equivalent of precise exceptions for in order
|         execution,  and for a single thread executing vector instructions, whereas  completion mask  allows out of order within a vector and/or vector length  threading.

|         IMHO an important realization I made in that meeting is that fault-on-first does not need to be just about faulting. It is totally fine to have the fault-on-first stuff
|         return up to the  first really long latency cost miss, as long as it always  guarantees that at least vector element zero was complete. Because vector element zero complete
|         is what guarantees forward progress.

|         Furthermore, it is not even required that fault-on-first stop at the first page-fault. An implementation could actually choose to actually implement a page-fault that did
|         copy-on-write or  swapped in from disk.   but that would be visible to the operating system, not the user program.  However, such an OS implementation  would have to
|         guarantee that it would not kill a process as a result  of a true permissions error page-fault. Or, if the virtual memory architecture made the distinction between
|         permissions faults and the sorts of page-fault that is for disk swapping or copy-on-write or copy  on read,  the OS does not need to be involved.

|          EVERYTHING about fault-on-first is a microarchitecture security/information leak channel and/or a virtualization hole. (Unless you only trim only on true faults and not  COW
|         or COR or disk swappage-faults).   However,  fault-on-first on any page-fault is a much  lower bandwidth  information leak  channel  than is fault-on-first on long latency
|         cache misses.  so a general purpose system might choose to implement fault-on-first on any page-fault, but might not want to implement fault-on-first on any cache miss.
|         However, there are some systems for which that sort of security issue is not a concern. E.g. a data center or embedded system where all of the CPUs are dedicated to a single
|         problem. In which case, if they can gain performance by doing fault-on-first on particular long latency cache misses, power to them!

|         Interestingly, although fault-on-first on long latency cache misses is a high-bandwidth information leak, it is actually  much less of a virtualization hole than
|         fault-on-first for page-faults.   The operating system or hypervisor has very little control over cache misses.  the OS and hypervisor have almost full control over
|         page-faults.  The usual rule in security and virtualization is that an application should not be able to detect that it has had an "innocent"  page-fault, such as COW or COR
|         or disk swapping.

|         --
|         --- Sorry: Typos (Speech-Os?) Writing Errors <= Speech Recognition <= Computeritis
--
--- Sorry: Typos (Speech-Os?) Writing Errors <= Speech Recognition <= Computeritis


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Krste Asanovic
 

Here's the strlen example from spec:

.text
.balign 4
.global strlen
# size_t strlen(const char *str)
# a0 holds *str

strlen:
mv a3, a0 # Save start
loop:
vsetvli a1, x0, e8,m8, ta,ma # Vector of bytes of maximum length
vle8ff.v v8, (a3) # Load bytes
csrr a1, vl # Get bytes read
vmseq.vi v0, v8, 0 # Set v0[i] where v8[i] = 0
vfirst.m a2, v0 # Find first set bit
add a3, a3, a1 # Bump pointer
bltz a2, loop # Not found?

add a0, a0, a1 # Sum start + bump
add a3, a3, a2 # Add index
sub a0, a3, a0 # Subtract start address+bump

ret

This exits when vfirst.m returns non-negative (i.e,, something triggered
exit condition) - the vfirst.m instruction can early-out when exit found
(though vle8ff/vmseq will still have to run to completion).

Krste

On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 20:04:15 +0200, Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@semidynamics.com> said:
| So all the vleff use cases end up then using a vmpopc of some sort to determine the exit condition and never use the trimmed VL ? (other than, of course, to
| control within the while how many elements should be operated upon). Do the compiler folks on the list agree that's the only use of vleff?

| roger.

| On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 7:53 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@cadence.com> wrote:

| I don't think the cases where there was no fault look any different to software than the fault cases.  Either can happen anywhere and the while loop may
| continue.  The while loop isn't ended by a trimmed vl, it's ended by data it sees.

|       Bill

| On 10/16/20 10:47 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:

| EXTERNAL MAIL

| We're all in agreement that if the spec says "pick where you stop" we'd all pick to trim to VL=3. I was under the impression this was not yet closed
| (in light of the "stop at cache misses" discussion), but I sense everyone else is already on the "pick where you stop" camp.

| Speaking of which, did we ever close on whether vleff could trim even when there was no fault (i.e., just because there's a cache miss for example)?
| If the answer is "yes, you can arbitrarily stop on any element other than element 0", can someone show a while loop and how the compiler would then
| use vleff? I'm not seeing how they would use it, other than enclose the vleff loop in a second loop to make sure that "the index variable has reached
| the limit" (i.e., i<n, make sure that vleff has run enough times so that i has reached n).

| roger.

| On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 7:33 PM <krste@berkeley.edu> wrote:

| As you get to pick where vl is trimmed, you would probably choose the
| vl=3 case here to simplify implementation.

| Krste

|||||| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:59:55 +0200, Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@semidynamics.com> said:

| | Bill you said element 9, but did you mean element labeled "a" which is the 11th element in the vector? (I agree with that). 
| | However, I would NOT agree that a masked out element has been written, even if past the failing point.

| | roger.

| | On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:57 PM Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@semidynamics.com> wrote:

| |     Here's where the "implementation" cost comes in (at least in our implementation; others, of course, may have more clever ways of doing this)

| -| If you pick "vl=3", then the vstart and vltrim calculations can be made one and the same
| -| If you pick "vl=6" then the vstart and vltrim calculations are not exactly equal and vltrim needs a LZC on the mask for the elements within the
| line
| |     followed by an adder. At SEW=8b, there can be lots of elements within a line...

| |     roger.

| |     On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:31 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@cadence.com> wrote:

| |         The way the discussion has been going, I think either would be permissible.  Not only that, but it would have been permissible for
| element 9 already
| |         to have been overwritten with 1's (if vma allows it).

| |         I think bringing this up is good as we need to be sure what precisely we mean by the v*ff instructions.

| |               Bill

| |         On 10/16/20 8:57 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:

| |             EXTERNAL MAIL

| |             Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

| |             image.png

| |             On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@gmail.com> wrote:

| |                 On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@berkeley.edu wrote:
| ||
| ||||||| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@gmail.com> said:
| || | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
| || | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
| ||
| || | Even if such appear "random".
| || [...]
| || | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
| || | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
| || | SOFTWARE control.
| ||
| || If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
| || guarantee forward progress?

| |                 The forward progress is to advance to another task.

| |                 In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
| |                 the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).

| ||
| || | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
| || | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
| || | be  readily checked for.
| || | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
| || | few instructions including the branch.
| ||
| || I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
| || microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
| || only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
| |                 The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
| |                 to check instead register state.
| ||
| || vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
| || we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
| || progress.

| |                 Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
| |                 exclude it outright.

| || Krste

| |             
| | x[DELETED ATTACHMENT image.png, PNG image]


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Roger Espasa
 


So all the vleff use cases end up then using a vmpopc of some sort to determine the exit condition and never use the trimmed VL ? (other than, of course, to control within the while how many elements should be operated upon). Do the compiler folks on the list agree that's the only use of vleff?

roger.

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 7:53 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@...> wrote:

I don't think the cases where there was no fault look any different to software than the fault cases.  Either can happen anywhere and the while loop may continue.  The while loop isn't ended by a trimmed vl, it's ended by data it sees.

      Bill

On 10/16/20 10:47 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:
EXTERNAL MAIL

We're all in agreement that if the spec says "pick where you stop" we'd all pick to trim to VL=3. I was under the impression this was not yet closed (in light of the "stop at cache misses" discussion), but I sense everyone else is already on the "pick where you stop" camp.

Speaking of which, did we ever close on whether vleff could trim even when there was no fault (i.e., just because there's a cache miss for example)?
If the answer is "yes, you can arbitrarily stop on any element other than element 0", can someone show a while loop and how the compiler would then use vleff? I'm not seeing how they would use it, other than enclose the vleff loop in a second loop to make sure that "the index variable has reached the limit" (i.e., i<n, make sure that vleff has run enough times so that i has reached n).

roger.


On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 7:33 PM <krste@...> wrote:

As you get to pick where vl is trimmed, you would probably choose the
vl=3 case here to simplify implementation.

Krste

>>>>> On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:59:55 +0200, Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@...> said:

| Bill you said element 9, but did you mean element labeled "a" which is the 11th element in the vector? (I agree with that). 
| However, I would NOT agree that a masked out element has been written, even if past the failing point.

| roger.

| On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:57 PM Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@...> wrote:

|     Here's where the "implementation" cost comes in (at least in our implementation; others, of course, may have more clever ways of doing this)

-| If you pick "vl=3", then the vstart and vltrim calculations can be made one and the same
-| If you pick "vl=6" then the vstart and vltrim calculations are not exactly equal and vltrim needs a LZC on the mask for the elements within the line
|     followed by an adder. At SEW=8b, there can be lots of elements within a line...

|     roger.

|     On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:31 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@...> wrote:

|         The way the discussion has been going, I think either would be permissible.  Not only that, but it would have been permissible for element 9 already
|         to have been overwritten with 1's (if vma allows it).

|         I think bringing this up is good as we need to be sure what precisely we mean by the v*ff instructions.

|               Bill

|         On 10/16/20 8:57 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:

|             EXTERNAL MAIL

|             Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

|             image.png

|             On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@...> wrote:

|                 On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@... wrote:
||
||||||| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@...> said:
|| | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
|| | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
||
|| | Even if such appear "random".
|| [...]
|| | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
|| | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
|| | SOFTWARE control.
||
|| If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
|| guarantee forward progress?

|                 The forward progress is to advance to another task.

|                 In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
|                 the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).

||
|| | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
|| | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
|| | be  readily checked for.
|| | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
|| | few instructions including the branch.
||
|| I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
|| microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
|| only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
|                 The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
|                 to check instead register state.
||
|| vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
|| we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
|| progress.

|                 Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
|                 exclude it outright.

|| Krste
| x[DELETED ATTACHMENT image.png, PNG image]


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Bill Huffman
 

I don't think the cases where there was no fault look any different to software than the fault cases.  Either can happen anywhere and the while loop may continue.  The while loop isn't ended by a trimmed vl, it's ended by data it sees.

      Bill

On 10/16/20 10:47 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:
EXTERNAL MAIL

We're all in agreement that if the spec says "pick where you stop" we'd all pick to trim to VL=3. I was under the impression this was not yet closed (in light of the "stop at cache misses" discussion), but I sense everyone else is already on the "pick where you stop" camp.

Speaking of which, did we ever close on whether vleff could trim even when there was no fault (i.e., just because there's a cache miss for example)?
If the answer is "yes, you can arbitrarily stop on any element other than element 0", can someone show a while loop and how the compiler would then use vleff? I'm not seeing how they would use it, other than enclose the vleff loop in a second loop to make sure that "the index variable has reached the limit" (i.e., i<n, make sure that vleff has run enough times so that i has reached n).

roger.


On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 7:33 PM <krste@...> wrote:

As you get to pick where vl is trimmed, you would probably choose the
vl=3 case here to simplify implementation.

Krste

>>>>> On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:59:55 +0200, Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@...> said:

| Bill you said element 9, but did you mean element labeled "a" which is the 11th element in the vector? (I agree with that). 
| However, I would NOT agree that a masked out element has been written, even if past the failing point.

| roger.

| On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:57 PM Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@...> wrote:

|     Here's where the "implementation" cost comes in (at least in our implementation; others, of course, may have more clever ways of doing this)

-| If you pick "vl=3", then the vstart and vltrim calculations can be made one and the same
-| If you pick "vl=6" then the vstart and vltrim calculations are not exactly equal and vltrim needs a LZC on the mask for the elements within the line
|     followed by an adder. At SEW=8b, there can be lots of elements within a line...

|     roger.

|     On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:31 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@...> wrote:

|         The way the discussion has been going, I think either would be permissible.  Not only that, but it would have been permissible for element 9 already
|         to have been overwritten with 1's (if vma allows it).

|         I think bringing this up is good as we need to be sure what precisely we mean by the v*ff instructions.

|               Bill

|         On 10/16/20 8:57 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:

|             EXTERNAL MAIL

|             Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

|             image.png

|             On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@...> wrote:

|                 On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@... wrote:
||
||||||| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@...> said:
|| | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
|| | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
||
|| | Even if such appear "random".
|| [...]
|| | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
|| | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
|| | SOFTWARE control.
||
|| If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
|| guarantee forward progress?

|                 The forward progress is to advance to another task.

|                 In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
|                 the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).

||
|| | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
|| | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
|| | be  readily checked for.
|| | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
|| | few instructions including the branch.
||
|| I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
|| microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
|| only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
|                 The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
|                 to check instead register state.
||
|| vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
|| we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
|| progress.

|                 Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
|                 exclude it outright.

|| Krste
| x[DELETED ATTACHMENT image.png, PNG image]


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Roger Espasa
 

We're all in agreement that if the spec says "pick where you stop" we'd all pick to trim to VL=3. I was under the impression this was not yet closed (in light of the "stop at cache misses" discussion), but I sense everyone else is already on the "pick where you stop" camp.

Speaking of which, did we ever close on whether vleff could trim even when there was no fault (i.e., just because there's a cache miss for example)?
If the answer is "yes, you can arbitrarily stop on any element other than element 0", can someone show a while loop and how the compiler would then use vleff? I'm not seeing how they would use it, other than enclose the vleff loop in a second loop to make sure that "the index variable has reached the limit" (i.e., i<n, make sure that vleff has run enough times so that i has reached n).

roger.


On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 7:33 PM <krste@...> wrote:

As you get to pick where vl is trimmed, you would probably choose the
vl=3 case here to simplify implementation.

Krste

>>>>> On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:59:55 +0200, Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@...> said:

| Bill you said element 9, but did you mean element labeled "a" which is the 11th element in the vector? (I agree with that). 
| However, I would NOT agree that a masked out element has been written, even if past the failing point.

| roger.

| On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:57 PM Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@...> wrote:

|     Here's where the "implementation" cost comes in (at least in our implementation; others, of course, may have more clever ways of doing this)

-| If you pick "vl=3", then the vstart and vltrim calculations can be made one and the same
-| If you pick "vl=6" then the vstart and vltrim calculations are not exactly equal and vltrim needs a LZC on the mask for the elements within the line
|     followed by an adder. At SEW=8b, there can be lots of elements within a line...

|     roger.

|     On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:31 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@...> wrote:

|         The way the discussion has been going, I think either would be permissible.  Not only that, but it would have been permissible for element 9 already
|         to have been overwritten with 1's (if vma allows it).

|         I think bringing this up is good as we need to be sure what precisely we mean by the v*ff instructions.

|               Bill

|         On 10/16/20 8:57 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:

|             EXTERNAL MAIL

|             Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

|             image.png

|             On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@...> wrote:

|                 On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@... wrote:
||
||||||| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@...> said:
|| | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
|| | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
||
|| | Even if such appear "random".
|| [...]
|| | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
|| | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
|| | SOFTWARE control.
||
|| If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
|| guarantee forward progress?

|                 The forward progress is to advance to another task.

|                 In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
|                 the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).

||
|| | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
|| | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
|| | be  readily checked for.
|| | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
|| | few instructions including the branch.
||
|| I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
|| microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
|| only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
|                 The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
|                 to check instead register state.
||
|| vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
|| we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
|| progress.

|                 Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
|                 exclude it outright.

|| Krste
| x[DELETED ATTACHMENT image.png, PNG image]


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Krste Asanovic
 

As you get to pick where vl is trimmed, you would probably choose the
vl=3 case here to simplify implementation.

Krste

On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 18:59:55 +0200, Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@semidynamics.com> said:
| Bill you said element 9, but did you mean element labeled "a" which is the 11th element in the vector? (I agree with that). 
| However, I would NOT agree that a masked out element has been written, even if past the failing point.

| roger.

| On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:57 PM Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@semidynamics.com> wrote:

| Here's where the "implementation" cost comes in (at least in our implementation; others, of course, may have more clever ways of doing this)

-| If you pick "vl=3", then the vstart and vltrim calculations can be made one and the same
-| If you pick "vl=6" then the vstart and vltrim calculations are not exactly equal and vltrim needs a LZC on the mask for the elements within the line
| followed by an adder. At SEW=8b, there can be lots of elements within a line...

| roger.

| On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:31 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@cadence.com> wrote:

| The way the discussion has been going, I think either would be permissible.  Not only that, but it would have been permissible for element 9 already
| to have been overwritten with 1's (if vma allows it).

| I think bringing this up is good as we need to be sure what precisely we mean by the v*ff instructions.

|       Bill

| On 10/16/20 8:57 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:

| EXTERNAL MAIL

| Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

| image.png

| On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@gmail.com> wrote:

| On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@berkeley.edu wrote:
||
||||||| On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@gmail.com> said:
|| | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
|| | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
||
|| | Even if such appear "random".
|| [...]
|| | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
|| | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
|| | SOFTWARE control.
||
|| If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
|| guarantee forward progress?

| The forward progress is to advance to another task.

| In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
| the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).

||
|| | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
|| | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
|| | be  readily checked for.
|| | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
|| | few instructions including the branch.
||
|| I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
|| microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
|| only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
| The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
| to check instead register state.
||
|| vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
|| we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
|| progress.

| Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
| exclude it outright.

|| Krste

|
| x[DELETED ATTACHMENT image.png, PNG image]


Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Bill Huffman
 

Roger,

I think it's an implementation choice whether vl is trimmed to 3 or 6 (or theoretically other values).  I don't know a reason why the implementation couldn't always trim vl to the same value that vstart would have been set to if the exception were being taken.  Does anyone know such a reason?  It seems simplest to me always to trim vl to the value vstart would have been set to.

I meant element 9.  If vma=1, then inactive elements can be undisturbed or set to 1's.  Element 'a' couldn't have been loaded in the case described because it was in a line with a fault.  In general, I think our discussions would have allowed element 'a' to be written if there were some other reason for trimming vl.

      Bill

On 10/16/20 9:59 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:
EXTERNAL MAIL

Bill you said element 9, but did you mean element labeled "a" which is the 11th element in the vector? (I agree with that). 
However, I would NOT agree that a masked out element has been written, even if past the failing point.

roger.

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:57 PM Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@...> wrote:
Here's where the "implementation" cost comes in (at least in our implementation; others, of course, may have more clever ways of doing this)

-> If you pick "vl=3", then the vstart and vltrim calculations can be made one and the same
-> If you pick "vl=6" then the vstart and vltrim calculations are not exactly equal and vltrim needs a LZC on the mask for the elements within the line followed by an adder. At SEW=8b, there can be lots of elements within a line...

roger.

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:31 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@...> wrote:

The way the discussion has been going, I think either would be permissible.  Not only that, but it would have been permissible for element 9 already to have been overwritten with 1's (if vma allows it).

I think bringing this up is good as we need to be sure what precisely we mean by the v*ff instructions.

      Bill

On 10/16/20 8:57 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:
EXTERNAL MAIL

Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

image.png

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@...> wrote:

On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@... wrote:
>
>>>>>> On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@...> said:
> | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
> | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
>
> | Even if such appear "random".
> [...]
> | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
> | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
> | SOFTWARE control.
>
> If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
> guarantee forward progress?

The forward progress is to advance to another task.

In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).


>
> | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
> | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
> | be  readily checked for.
> | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
> | few instructions including the branch.
>
> I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
> microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
> only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
to check instead register state.
>
> vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
> we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
> progress.

Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
exclude it outright.


> Krste






Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Roger Espasa
 

Bill you said element 9, but did you mean element labeled "a" which is the 11th element in the vector? (I agree with that). 
However, I would NOT agree that a masked out element has been written, even if past the failing point.

roger.

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:57 PM Roger Espasa <roger.espasa@...> wrote:
Here's where the "implementation" cost comes in (at least in our implementation; others, of course, may have more clever ways of doing this)

-> If you pick "vl=3", then the vstart and vltrim calculations can be made one and the same
-> If you pick "vl=6" then the vstart and vltrim calculations are not exactly equal and vltrim needs a LZC on the mask for the elements within the line followed by an adder. At SEW=8b, there can be lots of elements within a line...

roger.

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:31 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@...> wrote:

The way the discussion has been going, I think either would be permissible.  Not only that, but it would have been permissible for element 9 already to have been overwritten with 1's (if vma allows it).

I think bringing this up is good as we need to be sure what precisely we mean by the v*ff instructions.

      Bill

On 10/16/20 8:57 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:
EXTERNAL MAIL

Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

image.png

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@...> wrote:

On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@... wrote:
>
>>>>>> On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@...> said:
> | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
> | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
>
> | Even if such appear "random".
> [...]
> | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
> | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
> | SOFTWARE control.
>
> If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
> guarantee forward progress?

The forward progress is to advance to another task.

In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).


>
> | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
> | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
> | be  readily checked for.
> | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
> | few instructions including the branch.
>
> I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
> microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
> only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
to check instead register state.
>
> vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
> we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
> progress.

Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
exclude it outright.


> Krste






Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Roger Espasa
 

Here's where the "implementation" cost comes in (at least in our implementation; others, of course, may have more clever ways of doing this)

-> If you pick "vl=3", then the vstart and vltrim calculations can be made one and the same
-> If you pick "vl=6" then the vstart and vltrim calculations are not exactly equal and vltrim needs a LZC on the mask for the elements within the line followed by an adder. At SEW=8b, there can be lots of elements within a line...

roger.

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 6:31 PM Bill Huffman <huffman@...> wrote:

The way the discussion has been going, I think either would be permissible.  Not only that, but it would have been permissible for element 9 already to have been overwritten with 1's (if vma allows it).

I think bringing this up is good as we need to be sure what precisely we mean by the v*ff instructions.

      Bill

On 10/16/20 8:57 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:
EXTERNAL MAIL

Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

image.png

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@...> wrote:

On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@... wrote:
>
>>>>>> On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@...> said:
> | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
> | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
>
> | Even if such appear "random".
> [...]
> | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
> | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
> | SOFTWARE control.
>
> If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
> guarantee forward progress?

The forward progress is to advance to another task.

In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).


>
> | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
> | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
> | be  readily checked for.
> | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
> | few instructions including the branch.
>
> I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
> microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
> only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
to check instead register state.
>
> vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
> we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
> progress.

Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
exclude it outright.


> Krste






Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Bill Huffman
 

The way the discussion has been going, I think either would be permissible.  Not only that, but it would have been permissible for element 9 already to have been overwritten with 1's (if vma allows it).

I think bringing this up is good as we need to be sure what precisely we mean by the v*ff instructions.

      Bill

On 10/16/20 8:57 AM, Roger Espasa wrote:
EXTERNAL MAIL

Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

image.png

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@...> wrote:

On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@... wrote:
>
>>>>>> On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@...> said:
> | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
> | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
>
> | Even if such appear "random".
> [...]
> | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
> | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
> | SOFTWARE control.
>
> If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
> guarantee forward progress?

The forward progress is to advance to another task.

In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).


>
> | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
> | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
> | be  readily checked for.
> | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
> | few instructions including the branch.
>
> I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
> microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
> only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
to check instead register state.
>
> vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
> we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
> progress.

Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
exclude it outright.


> Krste






Re: [RISC-V] [tech-cmo] Fault-on-first should be allowed to return randomly on non-faults (also, running SIMT code on vector ISA)

Roger Espasa
 

Here's a question for the group: I did in as a picture... hopefully it will go through the mailing list:

image.png

On Fri, Oct 16, 2020 at 4:56 PM David Horner <ds2horner@...> wrote:

On 2020-10-16 10:30 a.m., krste@... wrote:
>
>>>>>> On Fri, 16 Oct 2020 07:48:00 -0400, "David Horner" <ds2horner@...> said:
> | First I am very happy that "arbitrary decisions by the
> | micro-architecture" allow reduction of vl to any [non-zero] value.
>
> | Even if such appear "random".
> [...]
> | A check for vl=0 on platforms that allow it is eminently doable, low
> | overhead for many use cases  AND guarantees forward progress under
> | SOFTWARE control.
>
> If we allowed implementation to return vl=0, how does software
> guarantee forward progress?

The forward progress is to advance to another task.

In the case of machine mode it can potentially "resolve" the cause of
the vl=0 return and re-execute the loop (without the overhead of the trap).


>
> | I see it as no different [in fundamental principle] than other cases
> | such as RVI integer divide by zero behaviour that does not trap but can
> | be  readily checked for.
> | Also RVI integer overflow that if you want to check for it is at most a
> | few instructions including the branch.
>
> I don't see how these examples relate to returning vl=0 on some
> microarchitectural event.  The examples here have results that depend
> only on architectural values, so can be deterministically handled.
The similarity is the avoidance of trap handling, when it is sufficient
to check instead register state.
>
> vl=0 is more related to load-reserved/store-conditional failure, where
> we need to add implementation constraints to guarantee forward
> progress.

Ok. I can see providing guidance as to when vl=0 is allowed, but not to
exclude it outright.


> Krste





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